11 Comments
Dec 16, 2022Liked by Nicole Lyon Roccas

what is interesting in my life, personally...there is no "before trauma." I was born into trauma. And trauma was all i knew until literally not quite 2 years ago (for perspective, I'll be 50 in February). I had no concept of "safety" or "peace" in my life, having literally never experienced it. So, there is no "before" for me. There is only "now" and the present and future I'm striving to build...which, thanks be to God, is built upon my (still somewhat unclear) notions and understanding of both "safety" and "peace." There is no before, for me. There is only now.

Expand full comment
author

The way you've been able to articulate this for yourself is beautiful, Kat! The sense of "lost time" can really be a hard grief for people waking up to the imprint of trauma in their lives, particularly when their history of it encompasses their whole lives in some way. I can see how knowing there is "no before" could really cause a lot of pain, loss, even anger, and these emotions in themselves (as valid as they are) could further sabotage healing. Somehow you've managed to turn it inside out--there is only the now. I'm sure at times this is not without its pain, but putting it this way is a compelling way to reframe, tell a new story, and ultimately exercise freedom and agency over your narrative. And all the things you've been up to in the last two years... For me, seeing your "new life" as you've shared with friends on social media has almost been like witnessing a resurrection from afar--but a resurrection (like Christ's) that still bears the scars you've lived through. Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Kat, and God's peace as you continue your journey!

Expand full comment

Thank you for sharing portions of your personal journey as you reflect on the intersection of Theology and Trauma. I will look forward to your book as the thoughts come together. In this writing I was struck by how mere language can embody a tension between its use for evil and its use in our personal and social history. As you write "How do we read the Torah after the Holocaust?" I am reminded of the Babylonian exile, "By the waters of Babylon there we sat down and wept when we remembered Zion. On the willows there we hung up our lyres. How shall we sing the Lord's song in a foreign land?" (Ps 137) When trauma leaves us in a foreign land, how can we sing? When trauma is experienced in the context of a religious (church) environment, songs, phrases, even the sight of a church can trigger defensive mechanisms (as described in The Body Keeps the Score).

I appreciate your thoughts on trauma as a 'problem' for theology. There certainly is a tension, particularly in the more evangelical realms of protestant tradition (my background). "Everything happens for a reason." "In Christ you are a new creation -- so bury (ignore) your past". In our advent studies we talked about a tension between darkness and light. I am drawn to your concept of theology as a container where we may hold both, and live with "the Mystery of all we may never know..." Remembering is certainly essential to healing. The words you write at the end resonate with my as I am sure they do with many others of your followers, "...emissaries meeting in the night from the trenches of traumatic grief." Theology can contain not only the mystery of incomprehensible, unexplainable suffering, but also the joy of silence in community with those who share grief.

While I speak of the personal, I also share grief over a world where trauma is systemic as well as intentional through war and inter-group conflicts. I grieve for the world.

Finally, again, I look forward to an upcoming book where you bring your thoughts together. While not Orthodox, I greatly appreciate what the Orthodox tradition offers. Thank you for sharing your life and thoughts. Sam

Expand full comment
author

YES! That question from Psalms was also/is also on my mind when I consider how to write theology after trauma, but I was running out of time/energy in pulling this post together to bring it in. Thinking of trauma specifically, and more broadly the fallen world in which trauma is a possibility, as a land of captivity and exile is a powerful metaphor/icon. Thank you for bringing that up, and sharing some of the other thoughts that came to you while reading. The common responses such as God has a reason are ones I'm sure many can relate to. I suppose that most of the time they are offered as a shortcut to meaning, a way to avoid having to actually sit among the confusion, fragmentation, and meaninglessness of trauma and/or traumatic grief. The meaning that comes from sitting with these things comes slowly and is almost unspeakable, more mysterious, hard to articulate with words. So we shortcut and fall back on our "elevator pitch" words of false comfort to have something to hold on to. That's my sense, at least.

Thanks again for being here and for your thoughtful comment.

Expand full comment

Thank you for sharing. I cried at the end... keep writing and sharing. So well written and powerful for the healing of yourself and others.

Expand full comment

Gruess Gott! Also, ursprunglich komme ich aus Chicago, aber ich habe mit der deutschen Sprache mit 15 echt angefangen, habe dort studiert, und spaeter auch jahrelang gewohnt. Irgendwie ist mein Weg in die orthodoxe Kirche mit Alexander Schmorell (heutzutage Sankt Alexander von Muenchen) eng verbunden. Als ich ueber ihn zuerst was geleben habe, war das wahrscheinlich im Jahre 2000 und er war auch in Deutschland kaum bekannt - wenn man ueber die Weisse Rose spricht, kennt fast jeder Hans und Sophie Scholl, aber die andere? Naja...

I've been Orthodox now for 20 years - baptized in Munich - and I have read the Gospel in German many times at Agape Vespers. One year, I did this up at the little church in Bonners Ferry, Idaho (wonderful, wonderful church!) In any case, there was a man who was standing a little bit behind me who let his displeasure with hearing the German language be known. "I can't believe Father let someone speak that Nazi language here!" Mind you, I wasn't yelling it out like Der Fuehrer; I don't know if I could if I wanted to. It was just odd to me that this man would be so incensed about this - after all, it wasn't the German language that was to blame, but certainly, there's still a lot of association between the atrocities of the Third Reich and the German language.

Expand full comment
author
Jul 20, 2023·edited Jul 20, 2023Author

Hallo, Katja! Vielen Dank für deine Anmerkungen, insbesonders auf Deutsch, denn ich habe seit langem ganz wenigen Möglichkeiten, mich mit anderen auf Deutsch zu unterhalten. Ist halt interessant, wie ähnlich unsere Lebenswege sind. Ich bin in Wisconsin aufgewachsen, nur 3 Stunden nördlich von Chicago, und war auch ziemlich jung, als ich mit Deutsch angefangen habe (etwa 12 oder 13 Jahre alt). Ich habe auch in Deutschland gearbeitet und studiert (erstmals in Fulda, das war 2005; später in Wolfenbüttel für meine Doktorarbeit, 2011-13).

Schön, dass du eine besondere Beziehung mit diesem Heiligen hast! Zufälligerweise habe ich nur neulich von ihm gelernt, so in die letzte Woche oder so. Mein Geburtstag war am Dienstag, welcher ist auch der Gedenktag der hl. Elisabeth von Hessen, eine liebliengsheilige von mir. Ich habe ein bisschen aufgesucht, andere Orthodoxen Heiligen die in Deutschland Zeit verbrachten, und deswegen habe über ihn ein bisschen gelesen.

Wie ging es mit der Orthodoxie in Deutschland? Ich fand es ganz schwer. Ich war nur neulich konvertiert gewesewn, als ich zum zweiten Mal dort gewohnt habe. Die Stadt wo ich wohnte war klein, ziemlich weit weg von einer regeltreffenden Kirche, une ohne eine gute Zugverbindung am Wochenende. Ab und zu konnte ich gehen, aber hatte immer das Gespür, dass ich nicht wilkommen war, denn ich nicht aus Russland gekommen bin... Seitdem habe ich ein besseres Verstand zugenommen, wie man sich mit ethnischen Gemeinden umgeht, aber damals fühlte mich sehr einsam und ernüchtert.

Sorry to hear about the experience you had while reading the Gospel in German. But yes, languages can trigger such intense fears and reactions in people, and German especially for folks of older generations. I guess it is similar in some ways to how people who were growing up around 9/11 make immediate assumptions when they hear people speaking what they believe is Arabic at an airport. We all have to be careful, don't we, to see others (and their langauges) as human beings!

Nice to chat and thank you for stopping by! Bring more German speakers, lol!

Expand full comment

Ich sitze hier zuhause, weniger als eine Meile entfernt von der Kueste der Michigansee, noerdlich von Racine in Wisconsin. Wir sind seit 2014 hier gewesen, damals mit drei Kinder, jetzt gibt es zwei mehr.

Ich war Austauschstudentin in Ingolstadt, zum Teil bei der FH Ingolstadt (heutzutage "technichal university"). Die Reise war teils sehr schoen, aber teils Katastrophe. Ich hatte Glueck, ich musste nicht wieder bei meiner Universitaet, ich war mit meinem Studium fertig. Fast am Ende dieser Zeit in Deutschland, haben wir das KZ-Lager in Dachau besucht. Es gibt dort eine russisch-orthodoxe Kapelle, und irgendwie war das mir wichtig um zu erinnern, dass die Nazis nicht nur Juden vernichtet haben, aber auch fast alle, die die kleineste Widerstand gemacht haben. Wir haben irgendwannmal ueber die Weisse Rose gesprochen. Naja, jeder in Deutschland kennt die Namen Hans und Sophie Scholl. Ich habe das ganz unfair gefunden - warum sollen die anderen so unbekannt bleiben? Ich habe mich bemueht, zumindest den Namen den anderen vier zu kennen, deswegen habe ich damals zuerst von Alexander Schmorell gehoert. Ich war erstaunt, dass er in Russland geboren ist, ich habe auch Russisch bei der Uni studiert, und wollte dorthin umziehen.

Nach den 11 September 2001, ist das Gefuehl in mir geschaerft, dass ich im Ausland wohnen wollte. Auch im diesem Jahr, fing ich an, eine orthodoxe Kirche zu besuchen. Beim ersten Besuch, in weniger als zwei Minuten, wusste ich, dass ich orthodox werden muss. Nur die eine Frage bleibt - wie?

Ein guter Freund von mir der in Deutschland wohnt, sagte mir, wenn ich in Deutschland wohnen wollte, wuerde er mir helfen... Ich war ja verrueckt genug, dass zu tun! Februar 2002 fing das Abenteuer an! Ich fing an, die MP Kirche (die Auferstehungsgemeinde) in Muenchen zu besuchen, ind in September 2002, bin ich dort getauft worden. Das erste mal, dass ich dort war, gab es ein Bild von Alexander Schmorell in der kirchliche "rasspisaniya" (bulletin). Ich wusste nicht, warum es ging, aber irgendwie war das ... interessant. (Spaeter, als ich etwas mehr Zeit hatte, habe ich verstanden, dass es um das Buch ueber AS dass Igor Chramow geschrieben hat.) Ich habe Arbeit bei der damaligen US - Armee Kaserne in Bad Aibling gefunden, und habe mehr ueber die Weisse Rose und Alexander Schmorell gelesen, auf Englisch und auch auf Deutsch. Damals gab es fast nichts ueber ihn selbst - das Buch von Igor Chramow war die erste Biografie ueber ihn... Aber es gab auch etwas hier und etwas dort in andere Buecher zu finden, und als ich gelesen habe, dass er glaubig orthodox war, war es mir wichtig, mehr daraus zu finden, und ja, ich habe das gemacht, und als Fr. John S. Orthodoxwiki gegrundet hat, hat er mir gebittet, was ueber Alexander Schmorell zu schreiben. Und so weiter und so fort. *L* Wir glauben, ja, dass die Heiligen lebendig sind; ich koente Stundenlang ueber den "Schurik" reden, aber mit ihm war das von Anfang an ganz klar. Und das war schon vor die "Glorification", die im Jahre 2012, stattgefunden ist. Leider konnte ich nicht dabei sein, aber ich bin im Jahre 2009 als Gast Igor Chramows nach Orenburg gereist, mit anderem, den 90te Geburtstag Alexander Schmorells zu feiern. Das war wirklich was. Erzbischof Mark (ROCOR) war auch dabei, auch Nikolai Hamazaspian, der sehr gut mit Schurik befreundet war (und versuchte ihm bei der unfolglose Flucht aus Deutschland zu helfen).

Naja... als ich dort war, war es mir fast egal wie die anderen reagierten. Der Priester kannte mich, und ich habe ihm gesagt, ich wollte mich taufen lassen. Und es ist passiert. Ich war nicht in ROCOR, und es gab nicht so viel auf Deutsch zu finden. Langsam fing ich an, Leute etwas besser zu kennen, zuerst die Margarita, die selbst Deutsche war, und Susanna, eine Witwe, die aus Grossbritannien stammte. Es gab eine Frau, Xenia Rahr, die den Chor geleitet hat - sie ist Russin, aber ihre Familie wohnte seit lange, lange her nicht mehr in Russland - ihr Vater war Journalist - Gleb Rahr - und ueberlebte eine sehr toedliche Transport nach Dachau, und er wurde in 1945 dort aus KZ befreit. Xenia konnte sehr gutes English - sie wurde als Baby in Japan von einem OCA Priester im US Armee getauft worden...

Ich bin letztes mal in Deutschland in April gewesen. Ich hatte die Moeglichkeit, in die Kirche zu gehen... Die ROCOR Kathedralkirche in Muenchen... Die Gemeinde, die Alexander Schmorell gehoerte... Er liegt gegenueber im Perlacher Forst Friedhof... Sehr, sehr schoen. Ein Freund von mir (der selbe als in 2002) ist mit mir gekommen; er ist katolisch, und dass ist das zweite mal, als er mit mir in die Kirche ging. Er war echt erstaunt, dass die Kirche fast voll war, er sagte mir, man sieht das nie mit katholichen Kirchen dort. Aber irgendwie bei den Orthodoxen ziemlich normal.

Hoffentlich war dein Geburtstag sehr schoen! Im Jahre 2004, war ich dabei, als die Geschwister von Alexander Schmorell etwas ueber Sachen gesprochen haben. Die Mutter von Alex ist sehr jung gestorben; sein Vater hat eine zweite Frau geheiratet, die, wie ihn, deutsch war. Er war evangelisch, sie katolisch, und die Geschwister sind katolisch getauft, aufgewachsen, usw. Die haben ueber ihre Mutter gesprochen, die, als eine deutsch-katolische Frau, die in Russland aufwuchs, ist mit zwei zukunftige orthodoxe Heilige begegnet. Sie war Krankenschwester, und dadurch hat die Elisabeth kennengelernt und mit ihr gearbeitet, dann spaeter, ihr Stiefsohn...

Naja, ich habe wahrscheinlich schon zu viel hier geredet! Ich schreibe ab und zu ueber Alexander hier: https://breathofhallelujah.com/category/orthodoxy/st-alexander-of-munich/

Ich freue mich sehr, Dich kennenzulernen! :)

Expand full comment

Has Jennifer ever seen your writing, particularly this story? She should.

Expand full comment
author

No I haven't, sadly... I haven't seen or talked to her in a decade and a half, and I believe she retired a while ago. I did share this with a few colleagues/fellow grad students I'm still in touch with from that time. I'll see what they think and perhaps send it her way. I always feel weird doing that... "Hi, it's been 15 years but here's this thing I wrote about probably the most difficult event in your life!! Anyway have a nice day!"

Expand full comment

Ya I get that... I think your idea to share with colleagues and fellow grad students is great and asking them what they think. But telling her how she helped you, seems a wonderful gift for healing? and of course she would understand you can only give voice to this many years later? Just my thoughts. Love to hear what your friends say?

Expand full comment